Monthly Archives: December 2015

Nothing To Report Sir, (but then again….)

I started writing a blog after being diagnosed with uterine cancer, primarily as a record of my own ‘journey’ but also as away of possibly helping others faced with the same life event.
Initially there was quite a bit to post. From my own and others reactions to the news, frustration about waiting, feeding my soul in general, mishaps in surgery, then first chemo. (See my other blogs.)  BUT since then there really has not been much to report/comment/moan/laugh about.  Nowt, zilch, not-a-hing, nutting, zero, sod-all – but then again…..
My second chemo cycle was more or less uneventful, but my enforced extra time indoors meant that in addition to doing the usual SCDA admin for the One-Act festival, and apart from  incorporating my scalp moles in a drawing cherries on my bald headMe being daft - so what's new! larking about at Christmas……….      I was able eventually to re-visit books I wrote many years ago for my grandchildren and publish two of them on Kindle.

My beloved Rainbow Dragon

My beloved Rainbow Dragon

‘The Rainbow Dragon’ was written after we took my four year old granddaughter to our bothy in Glencoe, and she was so delighted to go to the river to fetch water. The Rainbow Dragon character became very real to me over the years. As we drive in Glencoe I am wont to point out the wee bridge across the river as “that’s where Cherise met the Rainbow Dragon” almost believing it to have really happened, and it has always been  on my ToDo list to have it published.  I had the text of the book on e-file and a copy of it that I produced myself, so I finally got time to scan in the illustrations and tick my list . This is the link to the Kindle book

Connor and his sad friend Trevor the Tractor

Connor and his sad friend Trevor the Tractor

‘A Good Idea For Trevor The Tractor’ was written for my grandson at about the same age (or possibly a bit younger). He loved tractors – it was as simple as that – and the calling of “taktooor” when one is spotted has become part of tradition (well for me anyway) . The original book has been lost and I never kept a copy of it, but luckily when I was moving paperwork to Livingston, I came across a draft and some uncoloured illustrations, so I set about retyping it and colouring the drawings on the PC in ‘Paint’.   link to Kindle book here 

Today – Hogmanay – was my third chemo session and it went totally smoothly.  All traffic lights were at green, and there was hardly any traffic, so we drove there in a third of the usual time. Even the car park at the treatment centre had immediate entry (we waited 20 mins for a place last time).  Consequently I booked in an hour early and  was called minutes after.  Indeed all was so hunky-dory that I started getting my first drug infused at 11am – instead of 2pm both previous times.  I was finished by 3.45pm instead of 7.30 pm last time!
However – one thing that did happen was quite cathartic and worthy of note. An ex-work colleague who I had not seen for eight years, arrived to have (yet another) chemo session so came to sit next to me.  She is only in her mid 40s and has a young child, yet has been dealing with many cancers over a seven year period.  Every time she gets clear in one area of her body, the bloody disease appears somewhere else.  She started with breast cancer, then bile duct, liver and now bone, but she is not afraid and displays a wonderfully positive, yet utterly realistic, attitude to her sad prognosis of very short probable survival.  Discussing matters with her has reinforced my strong feeling that we have to live our lives in the present and very near future. We must squeeze every iota of  value out of our lives because we never know what is around the corner, in the skies, on the rails, across the road or flowing towards us for that matter – in flooded rivers or our own veins.   So maybe there was somat to report after all.

2015 in review

The stats helper monkeys prepared a 2015 annual report for this blog.  I started writing it as an aide memoire for myself to record how I was feeling, and possibly to assist anyone else who is either going through a similar experience or knows another person doing so. I hope it has achieved its aim.

Here’s an excerpt:

A San Francisco cable car holds 60 people. This blog was viewed about 1,200 times in 2015. If it were a cable car, it would take about 20 trips to carry that many people.

Click here to see the complete report.

A Roller-Coaster

There it was ...gone

There it was …gone

Phew! That was a roller-coaster of a day! Got my hair shaved off, which was a relief insofar I didn’t have to worry about it falling out all over the place any more, but still is a wee shock to the system when it’s all gone.



I felt not too bad when getting ready to go out for a Christmas meal, especially when I did my eye-make up, but I had to get ready many hours before I normally would because of needing to do something else before said meal. My scarf tying wasn’t too successful and started to slip a bit, taking with it some of my confidence. Anyway, I got it sorted and wore a hat on top to keep warmer outdoors.
We had a nice time meeting and greeting our friend Gro from Norway who is staying as my guest in my flat for a few weeks, but as we were going around Tesco’s with her to buy groceries, my eyes started playing up. Firstly I felt as though I needed to blink a lot and the vision just wasn’t quite right, then they were kinda feeling hot inside hot and Gro reckoned the whites were going pink! So to continue with the roller-coaster …. I bought eye-make remover pads and did the deed in Tesco’s loo, which resulted in my confidence plummeting, but it rose again after I did a bit more titivating back at the flat, only to duck again as I realised the scarf was becoming undone when we were on the bus. We arrived at our destination with plenty of time for me to have sorted the scarf BUT we were at the wrong venue!
Never mind the details, suffice it to say it was my stupidity, so my stress levels were mounting now. Bus back to car, then drive to correct restaurant – able to fix scarf, didn’t feel quite so bad about no eye-make up and had a lovely time with Mercators drama group – until I went to get my purse and discovered I’d not got my clutch bag containing purse with cash, bus pass and debit card! I immediately reported it to the waitress who said she would ask the manageress if anything had been handed in and that she would check the toilet . No sign. So Walter went to check the car – no sign. I decided to double check for myself and there it was, exactly where I’d put it. The waitress had checked a different toilet!  So…. my roller-coaster ended in a good place eventually.  Mercators old and new.


I suspect there are going to be a few more like this but then as long as the chemo ride stops in the right place it’ll be okay.   I hope.

Aye, always live in hope Susan.